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Detail, Tiramisu, 2018
Powder-coated aluminum
37,5 – 300 × 52 × 46 cm
Do – Mi – No – La – Ti – Do, Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH

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Exhibition view, Hidden Bar, 2018
Hidden Bar, Art Basel, CH

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Exhibition view, Hidden Bar, 2018
Art Basel, CH

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Ever since I fell down the stairs, things have changed, 2018
Powder-coated aluminum
37,5 – 300 × 52 × 46 cm
Do – Mi – No – La – Ti – Do, Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH

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Exhibition view, Do – Mi – No – La – Ti – Do, 2018
Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH

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Square Impulses, 2018
Steel, LED, six parts, 100 × 100 cm
Do – Mi – No – La – Ti – Do, Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH

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Detail, Square Impulses, 2018
Steel, LED, six parts, 100 × 100 cm
Do – Mi – No – La – Ti – Do, Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH

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Detail, Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, 2017
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Exhibition view, Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, 2017
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Exhibition view, Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, 2017
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Exhibition view, Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, 2017
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Untitled (Learn to Lay Brick) I, 2017
Steel, concrete, iron-oxide, hematite, 160 × 100 cm
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Untitled (Learn to Lay Brick) II, 2017
Steel, concrete, iron-oxide, hematite, 160 × 100 cm
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Untitled (Learn to Lay Brick) III, 2017
Steel, concrete, iron-oxide, hematite, 160 × 100 cm
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Untitled (Learn to Lay Brick) IV, 2017
Steel, concrete, iron-oxide, hematite, 160 × 100 cm
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Untitled (Learn to Lay Brick) V, 2017
Steel, concrete, iron-oxide, hematite, 160 × 100 cm
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Exhibition view, Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, 2017
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Exhibition view, Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, 2017
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Ghost Tones, 2017
HD Video, sound, 18′
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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The left is formed from the right, 2017
Steel, strings of light,
each 360 × 280 cm
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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Date Series (Barhi), 1–50, 2017
Mold-blown glass, variable dimensions, 50 uniques
Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE
Image: Bernhard Strauss

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The Image and the Figurative – Reflections on the work of Judith Kakon

Since the onset of digitalization, at the latest, the (visual) medium and art form of photography have undergone lasting ruptures, both in terms of technique and content. In response to the question of how a photographic image can attain significance – relevance for the individual and society – investigations have been conducted across disciplines using analog and digital sources, moving images, installative and conceptual approaches, all in equal measure. Accordingly, Judith Kakon’s artistic endeavor likewise does not express itself through singular works alone. Instead, having studied photography in New York and Jerusalem, the artist primarily works on the basis of specific installations and locations – she translates images into the spaces defined for them, which stand in intimate relation to one another. Through a process of experience, research and discovery, the ensuing spatial image comes to represent a theoretical inquiry into our visual memory.

Even the spatial installation executed in the context of the ceremony for the 2017 Alexander Bürkle Art Award is likewise to be understood as an interrelated setting. Untitled (Learn to lay Brick) I to V are the titles of five large-scale images that were exhibited there for the very first time. Custom-made steel frames were laid on the plastic foil-covered floor of the exhibition space and subsequently set with liquid concrete. The building material is not applied in a conventional manner, rather colored using various amounts of iron oxide or magnetite pigments in iridescent shades of red. On the one hand, the works of art contain a minimalistic aesthetic, heavily influenced by the appearance of concrete and steel. The title of the works refers to the obvious, to the conventional, functional application of the material: Concrete is used for construction all over the world, it can be obtained by anyone – it’s universal, so to speak. On the other hand, what stands out is the transformation in the appearance of the concrete: the plastic foil does not result in an image-side that looks matte, coarse or sandy, but rather one that is akin to the impression left by smooth, velvety and evenly laid foil, nearly appearing organic. During the Middle Ages, iron oxide was used in the production of mirrors, as it was able to produce a reflection when processed in a certain manner. The creases that arise on account of the foil, as well as the soft colors, permeate and shape the works, belying the massive weight which we connect with the materials being used. The dark contour of the steel frame also alludes to hints of processing and traces of material, such as shiny metallic sanding marks or rust spots in other places. Not necessary poured out to the exact edges, the viewer is repeatedly invited to retrace the stepby- step process behind the formation of the image, the physically manufactured act behind it, and the material’s immanent aesthetics which are borne of its material characteristics and artistic transformation. As such, the five works Untitled (Learn to lay Brick) are not merely a negative reproduction of the floor but also represent a potential appeal to awareness and visibility. The overarching question posed here reads: What are our expectations regarding the image? What is it meant to show us? How do we recognize the ideas which the artist intends for us to grasp?

The installation is also composed of two highly exciting steel constructions, The left is formed from the right, featuring arches onto which an LED light chain made of small illuminated points has been strung. Kakon has adapted their form from street lamps, the photographic depictions of which can be found in her archive. The handling of these forms does, however, appear to be even more crucial than the design vocabulary which Kakon cites, potentially carrying us off, at least in spirit, to some far-away place. Especially striking is that two arches laid inside one another reflect and therefore reproduce each other – the entire street lamp is duplicated within the space – and are also connected through the chain of lights. While the aspect of materiality once appeared primary, in the very next moment, the repeating design – the principle of duplication, defining the associative pitch within the spatial context with all of its architectural and art-historical implications – as well as through the immateriality of the light, suddenly becomes incomprehensible yet at the same time all encompassing. Kakon uses the possibility of defying the physical and ideal explicitness of an image to make the viewer aware of the context. Her installations always relate to the given space, yet also to that which is represented, and also explicitly to the viewer’s space. The brightness emitted from the LED chain of lights bathes the exhibition space and the viewers in a warm light. Along with the existing architecture, this feature was conceived together with the installation.

The associated played-back audiovideo installation Ghost Tones consists of an 18-minute sound file in which a velvety, melodious and nearly rhythmic female voice speaking English reads encyclopedic definitions of the term “accent”, understood as being a particular inflection, pronunciation or intonation, linguistically applied for emphasis and accentuation of a certain word, phrase, syllable or letter, or visually considered, for example, as a colorful accent. A poem follows in which each letter of the alphabet is assigned a line of the poem while the video displays a flickering street lamp which finally pauses for a moment to emit its light. Language is the main humanly means of communication. The application of language and writing represent one of the recurring tools used in Kakon’s installations. Spoken, written down, saved to data carriers and available for listening or for reading. Stickers were created in 2016 onto which the e-mail correspondence between the artist and chinese factory workers was printed. Not a single detail was left to chance, not a font nor the text size, not the pitch nor the speed of the speaker, and neither the choice of English – for each of these details carry information within them. An “accent” provides insights into our identity and our background – it embodies a cultural code. Moreover, accentuation aims to highlight something. What becomes all the more symbolic through this obvious dichotomy is that we simply ignore the countless definitions of accent which the speaking voice recites without any trace of an accent – entirely monotonous and the same. The only aspect that is accented is the imploring tone.

In one of her essays, the artist herself alludes to Édouard Glissant, the French writer, philosopher and pioneer of the debate surrounding multiculturalism.1 Along with an expanded concept of the photographic image, Kakon advocates a transcultural perspective on contemporary art. National identity is not congruent with cultural identity, being shaped through a transnational medial system of reference. Consequently, Kakon’s installations are likewise never enclosed, but are rather to be understood as impetus for ongoing thought processes. The artist’s projects and work stays, with her range of experiences and contexts, ensuing motifs and works of art, stretch over a web of references which will also constantly be cited, adapted and connotated anew in the future. The seriousness of this topic is also likely so impressive on account of that certain degree of lightness which is always ascribed to her: like found objects randomly dispersed in a room, ocher-colored glass vessels appear in the form of dates. Date Series, Barhi, is the title they assume. This widespread and much-exported food can practically be considered a cultural product of the Middle East. Yet each of the 50 glass vessels is also a unique piece that was molded using a barhi date. Moreover, the use of glass as a material was also not by chance: it is used for the purposes of storage in many diverse contexts, it is durable and it leaves no residue behind. It is also significant in view of the history of photography as, due in part to the characteristics described above, the very first “photos” were captured on panes of glass. The special emphasis of the original is, as such, set in opposition to the indicated serial process as well as to the reflection of the street lamps.

Kakon constantly poses questions as to the background of her of work: Why exactly am I making this sort of art and in this form? The questions that may arise during the reception are: How can a particular stance be communicated? Kakon acts as an observer and commentator of the sensitive interrelations between globalization, society and trade. Her installations reflect both her and our realities of life in the 21st century – and her precise formations imbue the complexities held in them with meaning.

– Eveline Weber

1 Glissant states that, in today’s world, no culture can exist in isolation from another; rather, cultures are constantly developing further through a process of mutual influence and enrichment. For him, this concept of transculturalism has been a prerequisite for any form of artistic production in the recent past.

The Image and the Figurative – Reflections on the work of Judith Kakon, Eveline Weber, 2017

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Exhibition View, +336449094580, 2018
Post Disaster Residency, Vitrolles, FR

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Ghost Tones, 2017
HD Video, sound, 18′

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Date Series (Medjool), 2017
Mold-blown glass, variable dimensions, 50 uniques

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Date Series (Deglet Nour), 2017
Mold-blown glass, variable dimensions, 50 uniques

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Date Series (Barhi), 2017
Mold-blown glass, variable dimensions, 50 uniques

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Exhibition view, Kunstkredit, 2017
Kunsthalle Basel, CH

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Exhibition view, Kunstkredit, 2017
Kunsthalle Basel, CH

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Exhibition view, Kunstkredit, 2017
Kunsthalle Basel, CH

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Exhibition view, Arresting Fragments of the World, 2017
Kunsthaus Langenthal, CH

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Exhibition view, Arresting Fragments of the World, 2017
Kunsthaus Langenthal, CH

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Exhibition view, Arresting Fragments of the World, 2017
Kunsthaus Langenthal, CH

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Exhibition view, Arresting Fragments of the World, 2017
Kunsthaus Langenthal, CH

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Alviero Martini, Voyage, 2016/17
Acrylic glass, 90 x 60 x 3 cm

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Exhibition view, A WORD IS A SHADOW THAT FALLS ON A LOT OF THINGS, 2017
Co-organized with Mia Sanchez
Ausstellungsraum Klingental, Basel, CH

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Review, A WORD IS A SHADOW THAT FALLS ON A LOT OF THINGS
Spike 53, print
Elise Lammer, 2017

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A WORD IS A SHADOW THAT FALLS ON A LOT OF THINGS
Co-organized with Mia Sanchez

With:
Sadie Benning
Lygia Clark
Manthia Diawara
Mel Elberg
Selina Grüter & Michèle Graf
Hans Josephsohn
Judith Kakon
Adam Kaplan
Lucie Kolb (Brand-New-Life)
Mia Sanchez
Alan Segal
Anselm Stalder
The Kindred of the Kibbo Kift
Layla Winter

You say that when you speak this language, you are a different person. Or rather, you become one of the many that are your identities. The connection to your body changes, first to the inner life, your emotions and thoughts, as well as how you address and behold your surroundings. Is it dependent, at the level of society, on the language’s heritage, at the level of the individual, on your ties to personal experiences? The question is how language defines identity and vice-versa. How can this correlation be shown, challenged or shifted?

To project identity (on to the model). To make up one’s own by referencing others. To create
an exclusive identity by way of a secret language. Or to invent a new language defined by the personal. To split identity and allow for multiplicity and ambiguity. To hide behind or take on another(‘s). Or to aim for featurelessness altogether. It carries with it the matter of perspective, which is one of inclusion and exclusion, of the self and the other. How to be oneself without shutting out others, how to open up to others without losing oneself?

If, as you say, the south is the body, the projected place of desire, the image of light and life and warmth, and the north is the head, the image of death and darkness and freezing
– these binaries are the restrictions to grapple with. Accepting existing paths of identification, predetermined and prescribed, can trap and imprison. To find representation for the ideas to manifest, in form and materiality. Now they take space, as does the shadow: Body and other and changing but bound. The simultaneous existence of many. Like the Möbius strip, which has only one boundary, there is no outside and no in.

‘I see a ring,’ said Bernard, ‘hanging above me. It quivers and hangs in a loop of light.’

‘I see a slab of pale yellow,’ said Susan, ‘spreading away until it meets a purple stripe.’

‘I hear a sound,’ said Rhoda, ‘cheep, chirp; cheep chirp; going up and down.’

‘I see a globe,’ said Neville, ‘hanging down in a drop against the enormous flanks of some hill.’

‘I see a crimson tassel,’ said Jinny, ‘twisted with gold threads.’

‘I hear something stamping,’ said Louis. ‘A great beast’s foot is chained. It stamps, and stamps, and stamps.’

‘Look at the spider’s web on the corner of the balcony,’ said Bernard. ‘It has beads of water on it, drops of white light.’

‘The leaves are gathered round the window like pointed ears,’ said Susan.

‘A shadow falls on the path,’ said Louis, ‘like an elbow bent.’…‘ I burn, I shiver,’ said Jinny, ‘out of this sun, into this shadow.’

Virginia Woolf, The Waves, 1931

– Geraldine Tedder

A WORD IS A SHADOW THAT FALLS ON A LOT OF THINGS,
Geraldine Tedder, 2017

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Blue White High, 2013
HD Video, 23′29″
(rework 2017)

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Exhibition View, Kiefer Hablitzel Prize, 2017
Swiss Art Awards, Basel, CH
Image: Guadalupe Ruiz

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Exhibition View, Kiefer Hablitzel Prize, 2017
Swiss Art Awards, Basel, CH
Image: Guadalupe Ruiz

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Alibaba Mails, Judith Kakon
published by the Kingsboro Press, ed. 100, 2017
http://thekingsboropress.com/catalogue/judith-kakon-ali-baba-mai

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Exhibition View, Unter 30 Kiefer Hablitzel, 2017
Ex Macello Pubblico, MASI, Lugano, CH

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Untitled (Alibaba) I, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Untitled (Alibaba) II, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Untitled (Alibaba) III, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Untitled (Alibaba) IV, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Untitled (Alibaba) V, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Untitled (Alibaba) VI, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Untitled (Alibaba) VII, 2017
C-Print, framed, 90 x 60 cm

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Exhibition view, White Noise, 2015
Kunsthaus Glarus, CH
Image: David Aebi

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Exhibition view, White Noise, 2015
Kunsthaus Glarus, CH
Image: David Aebi

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Exhibition view, White Noise, 2015
Kunsthaus Glarus, CH
Image: David Aebi

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Exhibition view, White Noise, 2015
Kunsthaus Glarus, CH
Image: David Aebi

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Mermaid Wang, 2015
Glass pane, Silver 20 Interior Film, LED sheet, Arduino-Board controller, Xerox-print, 3D-print (ABS), 90 × 60cm
Image: David Aebi

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Exhibition view, White Noise, 2015
Kunsthaus Glarus, CH
Image: David Aebi

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Print files, Mermaid Wang, Tina Tan, Luna Sun, Summer Pine, Summer Zuo, Summer Xia, Fiona Zhu, Christy Deng, Rainey Lee, Ruby Cheng , 2015

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Print Files, (Untitled) Alibaba, Stickers, 2016/17

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Exhibition view, A stream with bright fish, 2015
Taylor Macklin, Zurich, CH
Image: Gina Folly

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Exhibition view, A stream with bright fish, 2015
Taylor Macklin, Zurich, CH
Image: Gina Folly

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Wellcome I, 2015
Glass, Silver 20 Interior Film, LED-sheets, Arduino-Boards,
each 60 × 90 cm
Image: Gina Folly

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Wellcome I, 2015
Glass, Silver 20 Interior Film, LED-sheets, Arduino-Boards,
each 60 × 90 cm
Image: Gina Folly

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Exhibition view, A stream with bright fish, 2015
Taylor Macklin, Zurich, CH
Image: Gina Folly

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Limi-tropical, 2015
Glass, Silver 20 Interior Film, LED-sheets, Arduino-Boards, print on silk, 146,5 × 86,3 × 0.2 cm
Image: Gina Folly

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Exhibition view, A stream with bright fish, 2015
Taylor Macklin, Zurich, CH
Image: Gina Folly

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Tone of Voice (Version I), 2015
Projection, PowerPoint slides, car model names
Taylor Macklin, Zurich, CH
Image: Gina Folly

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A Stream With Bright Fish
Judith Kakon

A first step in the process of constructing a concrete tilt-up wall is forming a level horizontal plane onto which the wall will be cast. A relatively straightforward procedure allows for such a wall to be formed right where it is meant to stand thus making the installation a simple tilting into place. Judith Kakon’s tilt-up concrete sculptures with their slight tint of color and bodily proportions oscillate between a stark formalism and a sensitive materiality. In a former version of these works, the pressed absence of two sides of a coin marks both walls acting like a time capsule as though she is preparing for the future by selecting what should be archived. In her most recent work she replicates the cast form with walls that perform as images, at once one thing and then another.

In Man and the Sacred , Roger Caillois describes the way in which the left is formed from the right, always a perversion of the other, stating “...gaucherie is a sign of evil intent and augury of failure. It is at once maladroitness, at once cause and effect of every tortuous, crooked, or oblique power, of every false calculation or maneuver. It is everything uncertain and everything that falls short of its goal; and that which is uncertain and cause of suspicion and fear, all that is imperfect...” Something of this pervades Judith’s methods, as though drawn to the periphery, her images and installations demand a sideways view, a view askance, a view through and into. Teetering on the edge of the perverse, her work is not afraid to employ the deceits that are often used to construct auras of power in order to find a ground for subversion. Frequently she utilizes a two-way mirror as a shifting entity that reveals and conceals, its form both affirmation and negation, aesthetic and duplicitous, an opening and a closing. She subverts a traditional narrative of the right versus the left by rendering both as versions of themselves and in so doing challenges the presumed deficiencies of an oblique perspective.

Observing the way Judith works, in particular the way she has of searching for the elemental, is like watching a skilled diviner holding out a forked rod to reveal a source of water. The spaces occupied by her work consistently negate a progressive narrative of linear time. If anything, the cadence of Judith’s work seems to find structure around a form of arrhythmia within which the past and the present collapse causing things we’ve seen previously to become things seen anew. Her capacity to embrace and dismantle apparent contradictions is evident in the way she employs images that appear and disappear in shifting forms and are often complicated by pulsating light sources and reflections. Judith’s work entangles the viewer in the act of looking, a diagonal glance becomes the necessary lens from which to find a foothold in a practice that has a slippery intangibility; the imagery Judith employs is inherently damaged, existing always in a state of interference within an ever expanding periphery.

– Phoebe D’heurle

A stream with bright Fish
Phoebe d'Heurle, 2015

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Untitled (Weedblock), 2014
PVC (weedblock), steel ropes
variable dimensions
Kunsthaus Baselland, CH
Image: Sylvain Baumann

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Detail, Untitled (Weedblock), 2014
PVC (weedblock), steel ropes
variable dimensions
Kunsthaus Baselland, CH

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Exhibition view, Being Specific, 2013
Kunsthaus Baselland, Muttenz, CH

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(sic), 2013
mesh tarp, digital print
300 × 1200 cm
Kunsthaus Baselland, Muttenz, CH

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Detail, (sic), 2013
mesh tarp, digital print
300 × 1200 cm
Kunsthaus Baselland, Muttenz, CH

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(sic) 2, 2013
mesh tarp, digital print, autopoles
202 x 380 cm
Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art, Herzliya, IL

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Detail, (sic) 2, 2013
mesh tarp, digital print, autopoles
202 x 380 cm
Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art, Herzliya, IL

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CV
Judith Kakon
1988, Basel, CH

EDUCATION
2014 - 16
Master of Fine Arts / MFA, Bard MFA, Milton Avery School of the Arts, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, USA

2009 - 13
Bachelor of Fine Arts / BFA, Photography Department, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, IL

EXHIBITIONS/PROJECTS
2018
Gemini II, Anorak at Solitude Project Space, Stuttgart, DE (upcoming)
Hidden Bar, Art Basel 2018, Basel, CH
Do – Mi – No – La – Ti - Do, Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH
+33644909458, Off / Post Disaster, Vitrolles, FR

2017
Le lieu secret, org. v. Emilie Guenat & Florence Jung, Biel, CH (solo)
Ocarina of Space, M53, Luzern, CH
Unter 30 Kiefer Hablitzel, Ex Macello Pubblico, MASI, Lugano, CH
Kunstpreis Alexander-Bürkle, Kunsthaus L6, Freiburg, DE (solo)
Kunstkredit Basel-Stadt, Werkbeiträge, cur. by Julia Moritz and Stefan Burger, Kunsthalle Basel, CH
A WORD IS A SHADOW THAT FALLS ON A LOT OF THINGS, org. with Mia Sanchez, Ausstellungsraum Klingental, Basel, CH
Book Launch, Alibaba Mails, Riverside Space, Worblaufen, CH
Kiefer Hablitzel Award, Swiss Art Awards, Messe Basel, CH
Arresting Fragments of the World, cur. by Claire Hoffmann, Kunsthaus Langenthal, CH

2016
Ernte 16, Museum Zu Allerheiligen, cur. by Isabelle Koepfli, Schaffhausen, CH
There Is No Place Like Home, Roma Tevere, Rome, IT
MFA Thesis Exhibition, Bard MFA, Red Hook, NY, USA
Kiss & Go, Istituto Svizzero di Roma, Rome, IT
Proscenio, Studioli, Rome, IT
Alfabeto, Materia Multipli d’Artista, Rome and Palermo, IT

2015
Cakebread, with Othmar Farré, Tilt, Renens, Festival Les Urbaines, cur. by Samuel Leuenberger, Lausanne, CH
Ernte 15, Museum zu Allerheiligen, Schaffhausen, CH
A stream with bright fish, Taylor Macklin, Zürich, CH (solo)
White Noise, cur. by Sabine Rusterholz, Kunsthaus Glarus, CH
Brother, org. by Omri Livne, Near my Desk at Semperdepot, Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Vienna, AT (solo)

2014
Annäherung an Architektur/Approaching Architecture, Regionale 15, Kunsthaus Baselland, Muttenz, CH
Plans for the future, Blackbox III, Manofim, Jerusalem, IL
In Between, Eine produktive Balance, Galerie Baviera, Zürich, CH
Rising Star, cur. by Tal Bechler, Ghila Limon and Dalia Levin, Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art, Herzliya, IL

2013
Being Specific!, Regionale 14, cur. by Ines Goldbach and Dunja Herzog, Kunsthaus Baselland, Muttenz, CH
Goods, cur. by Liz Hagag and Joshua Simon, Museum of Bat Yam (MoBY), Bat Yam, IL
BFA Thesis Exhibition, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem, IL
To Marry the Widow of a Childless Mother, cur. by Tal Gilad, CSP Gallery,
Center for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv, IL

WORKSHOPS
2015 - 16
Studio Roma, Value and surplus value; between aesthetic experience, artistic practice and academic research, Istituto Svizzero di Roma, IT

2011 - 12
Why Love Hurts, Workshop by Prof. Eva Illouz, Yaffo 23, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem, IL

PRIZES UND SCHOLARSHIPS
2017
Kunstpreis Alexander Bürkle, Freiburg, DE
Kiefer Hablitzel Prize, CH

2016
Werkbeitrag, Kunstkredit Basel-Stadt, CH
Berlin - Mitte Residency 2017, Kanton Schaffhausen, CH

2015 & 16
Patronagefonds für Junge Schweizer Kuenstler, Basler Kunstverein, CH

2015
Ernte - Kunstpreis, Museum zu Allerheiligen, Schaffhausen, CH
UBS Kulturstiftung, Förderbeitrag, CH

2014 - 16
Bard MFA, Scholarship und Fellowship, NY, USA

2012 & 13
Prize for Outstanding Achievements, Bezalel Academy, IL

PRESS/PUBLICATIONS
2018
Meet me at M53, Popup Press, Basel, CH
Swiss Emerging Artist Prize, Société Générale, Geneva, CH

2017
Unter 30 Kiefer Hablitzel Preis, Verlag für moderne Kunst, CH (publ.)
Judith Kakon, Kunstpreis, Alexander-Bürkle Verlag, Freiburg, DE (publ.)
Kunstbulletin 11/2017: Judith Kakon, Yvonne Ziegler
Spike Magazin, A WORD IS A SHADOW THAT FALLS ON A LOT OF THINGS, by Elise Lammer
Kulturjoker, Entlang der Datteln, Annette Hoffmann
Badische Zeitung „Stimme schafft Stimmung“, Antje Lichtleiter
Artline Magazin, Portrait Judith Kakon, Baharak Omidfard, DE
Alibaba Mails, The Kingsboro Press, LA/NY, USA (publ.)
The Arrow Maker, 8fold, London, GB

2016
Studio Roma Notes, Istituto Svizzero di Roma, IT
Bard MFA, Thesis Exhibition Catalogue, NY, USA

2015
Artline Magazin, Special Jahresschauen 2015/16, DE
Mousse Special, The Future is Here, with Kilian Rüthemann, inv. by Samuel Leuenberger via Chus Martinez, Milano, IT
Brother Edition (50), with Omri Livne, Vienna, AT

2014
Harama Online Magazine, Manofim.org Plans for the future, Blackbox III, Manofim, Jerusalem, IL

2013
Basler Zeitung, Kreative, Kontakte, Kontostand, CH
Haaretz, Hasifa Photography Blog haaretz.co.il/blogs/photoblog
BFA Thesis Exhibition Catalog, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem, IL

2012
Bezalel in Ashdod, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem, IL

WORK EXPERIENCE, PUBLIC TALKS
2017 –
Artistic and Scientific Assistant, Fine Arts, HKB, Bern CH

2018
Public Talk, über die Arbeit Sprechen, Fine Arts, HKB, Bern, CH

2017
External Jury, Master of Art in Public Sphere, ECAV, Sierre, CH

2015
External Jury, Bachelor Thesis Show, FHNW, Academy of Art and Design, Institute of Art, Basel, CH

CV

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Judith Kakon, 2018. judith.kakon@me.com

Design: Ronnie Fueglister http://www.ronniefueglister.ch

Coding: Jonathan Kakon http://drimaeie.com

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